ejectment


ejectment
eject·ment /i-'jekt-mənt/ n: an action at common law that is to determine the right to possession of property and for the recovery of damages and that is brought by a plaintiff who claims to hold superior title

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

ejectment
index deportation, eviction, expulsion, layoff

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


ejectment
n.
A common law action brought by a property owner to eject a tenant who has refused to leave at the appointed time or someone claiming the land by adverse possession.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


ejectment
A lawsuit brought to remove a party who is occupying real property. This is not the same as an unlawful detainer (eviction) suit, because it is against someone who has wrongfully tried to claim title to the property, not a tenant who only has a right of possession. Example: George lives on a ranch which he claims he has inherited from his great uncle, but Betty sues for ejectment on the basis that, in fact, she was entitled to the property through her parents.
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


ejectment
n. The removal of a tenant or owner from property he or she occupies; a legal action by which a person removed from property seeks to recover it.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


ejectment
One of the old forms of action for recovery of the possession of real property.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


ejectment
One of the old forms of action for recovery of the possession of real property.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

ejectment
n.
   a lawsuit brought to remove a party who is occupying real property. This is not the same as an unlawful detainer (eviction) suit against a non-paying or unsatisfactory tenant. It is against someone who has tried to claim title to the property. Example: George Grabby lives on a ranch which he claims he has inherited from his great uncle, but Betty Benefield sues for ejectment on the basis that, in fact, she was entitled to the property through her parents.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ejectment — E*ject ment, n. 1. A casting out; a dispossession; an expulsion; ejection; as, the ejectment of tenants from their homes. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) A species of mixed action, which lies for the recovery of possession of real property, and damages… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ejectment — A lawsuit brought to remove a party who is occupying real property. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012. ejectment A lawsuit brought to remove a party who is occupying real property …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • ejectment — [ē jekt′mənt, iekt′mənt] n. 1. an ejecting or ousting; eviction 2. Law an action to secure or recover possession of real property by the true owner …   English World dictionary

  • ejectment — At common law, this was the name of a mixed action (springing from the earlier personal action of ejectione firmae) which lay for the recovery of the possession of land, and for damages for the unlawful detention of its possession. The action was …   Black's law dictionary

  • ejectment — /i jekt meuhnt/, n. 1. the act of ejecting. 2. Law. a possessory action wherein the title to real property may be tried and the possession recovered. [1560 70; EJECT + MENT] * * * ▪ law       in Anglo American property law, legal action for… …   Universalium

  • Ejectment — This article is about the Common Law form of action. For a fuller discussion of modern proceedings, see Eviction. Ejectment in the common law term for civil action to recover the possession of and title to land. It replaced the old Real Actions… …   Wikipedia

  • ejectment — An action which is purely possessory; a form of action in which the right of possession to corporeal hereditaments may be tried and possession obtained. Kingsnorth v Baker, 213 Mich 294, 182 NW 108. At common law a purely possessory action; even… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • ejectment — k(t)mənt noun ( s) 1. : dispossession the ejectment of tenants from their homes 2. a. : a mixed action admissible for the recovery of possession of property and for damages and costs for the wrongful withholding of it …   Useful english dictionary

  • ejectment — noun Date: 1523 1. the act or an instance of ejecting ; dispossession 2. an action for the recovery of possession of real property and damages and costs …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • ejectment — noun a) A casting out. b) A species of mixed action, which lies for the recovery of possession of real property, and damages and costs for the wrongful withholding of it. Syn: ejection …   Wiktionary


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