immaterial


immaterial
im·ma·te·ri·al /ˌi-mə-'tir-ē-əl/ adj: not essential, pertinent, or of consequence
the jury could have discounted the medical history evidence, or while accepting its accuracy, found it immaterialWillett v. State, 911 S.W.2d 937 (1995) compare irrelevant
im·ma·te·ri·al·i·ty /ˌi-mə-ˌtir-ē-'a-lə-tē/ n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

immaterial
I adjective baseless, beside the point, beside the question, bodiless, chimerical, diminutive, ethereal, expers corporis, extraneous, groundless, impertinent, inapplicable, inappreciable, inappropriate, inconsequential, incorporeal, inessential, insignificant, insubstantial, intangible, irrelevant, lightweight, meaningless, minor, nominal, nonessential, nonphysical, not connected with, not important, not pertaining to, not pertinent, nullius momenti, of little account, of no consequence, of no essential consequence, of no importance, of no moment, of no significance, off the point, off the topic, other wordly, out of place, out-of-the-way, outside the question, pointless, remote, sine corpore, spectral, trivial, unessential, unimportant, unrelated, unsubstantial, vaporous, without depth, without substance, without weight, worthless associated concepts: immaterial allegations, immaterial alteration, immaterial averment, immaterial breach, immaterial facts, immaterial issues, immaterial testimony, immaterial variance, incompetent evidence, irrelevant evidence II index frivolous, impertinent (irrelevant), imponderable, inapposite, inconsequential, inconsiderable, incorporeal, insubstantial, intangible, irrelevant, minor, negligible, nugatory, null (insignificant), slight, trivial, unessential

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


immaterial
adj.
Irrelevant; not essential; of no material importance. See also material

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


immaterial
1) In court, a commonly heard objection to introducing evidence in a trial on the ground that it had nothing substantial to do with any issue in the case.
2) In a lawsuit, a matter that has no bearing on the issues in dispute.
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


immaterial
Not essential or necessary; not important or pertinent; not decisive; of no substantial consequence; without weight; of no material significance.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


immaterial
Not essential or necessary; not important or pertinent; not decisive; of no substantial consequence; without weight; of no material significance.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

immaterial
adj.
   a commonly heard objection to introducing evidence in a trial on the ground that it had nothing substantial to do with the case or any issue in the case. It can also apply to any matter (such as an argument or complaint) in a lawsuit which has no bearing on the issues to be decided in a trial. The public is often surprised at what is immaterial, such as references to a person's character or bad deeds in other situations.
   See also: irrelevant, objection

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • immaterial — immaterial, spiritual, incorporeal are comparable when meaning not composed of matter. Immaterial is the most comprehensive of these terms because it makes the line of cleavage between itself and its opposite, material, not only clear and sharp… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Immaterial — Im ma*te ri*al ([i^]m m[.a]*t[=e] r[i^]*al), a. [Pref. im not + material: cf. F. immat[ e]riel.] 1. Not consisting of matter; incorporeal; spiritual; disembodied. [1913 Webster] Angels are spirits immaterial and intellectual. Hooker. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • immaterial — [adj1] irrelevant extraneous, foreign, impertinent, inapplicable, inapposite, inappropriate, inconsequential, inconsiderable, inconsiderate, inessential, insignificant, irrelative, matter of indifference, meaningless, no big deal*, no never mind* …   New thesaurus

  • Immaterial — (v. lat.), unkörperlich. Immaterialismus, so v.w. Spiritualismus. Immaterialist, der den Geist nicht für einen Theil der Materie hält. Immaterialität, 1) Unkörperlichkeit, Stofflosigkeit; 2) Freiheit von jeder Beschränkung durch die Materie …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Immaterial — Immateriāl (neulat.) oder immateriéll (frz.), unkörperlich, stofflos; immaterialisieren, entkörpern, vergeistigen; Immaterialismus, Lehre von der Unsterblichkeit der Seele; Immaterialität, Unkörperlichkeit; Freiheit von jeder Beschränkung durch… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Immaterial — Immaterial, lat. deutsch, unkörperlich; I.ismus, die Lehre von der Unsterblichkeit der Seele, I.ist, wer dieser Lehre anhängt; I.ität, Unkörperlichkeit …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • immaterial — (adj.) late 14c., spiritual, incorporeal, from M.L. immaterialis not consisting of matter, spiritual, from assimilated form of in not, opposite of (see IN (Cf. in ) (1)) + L.L. materialis (see MATERIAL (Cf. material)). Secondary sense of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • immaterial — ► ADJECTIVE 1) unimportant under the circumstances; irrelevant. 2) spiritual rather than physical. DERIVATIVES immateriality noun …   English terms dictionary

  • immaterial — [im΄ə tir′ē əl] adj. [ME immateriel < LL immaterialis: see IN 2 & MATERIAL] 1. not consisting of matter; incorporeal; spiritual 2. that does not matter; not pertinent; unimportant immateriality [im΄ə tir΄ēal′ə tē] n. pl. immaterialities i …   English World dictionary

  • immaterial — Not material, essential, or necessary; not important or pertinent; not decisive; of no substantial consequence; without weight; of no material significance. See also impertinence irrelevancy irrelevant allegation Compare material; material fact;… …   Black's law dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.