redundancy


redundancy
I noun duplication, excess, excessiveness, immoderation, inordinacy, inordinate amount, needlessness, nimiety, overplus, oversupply, pleonasm, recurrence, redundance, redundantia, reiteration, repetition, restatement, retelling, superabundance, superfluity, surplus, tautology II index overage, prolixity, surplus, tautology

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


redundancy
Redundancy arises if the employer ceases to carry on or closes the business in which the employee was engaged, if the employer no longer needs the skills of the employee or needs fewer to carry out the work.

Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. — UK law terms.


redundancy
n.
The inclusion of words or arguments that could be omitted without harming the ultimate meaning; the inclusion of unnecessary material in a document or pleading.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


redundancy
termination of employment because of the disappearance of the need for a job. In the employment law of the UK, certain rights accrue to someone who is made redundant, i.e. if his dismissal is the result wholly or mainly of the cessation of the employer's business or to the cessation or diminution of demands for particular work. Redundancy can be a potentially fair reason for dismissal, preventing a claim for unfair dismissal, but it might be unfair if the particular employee has been unfairly selected, as where he is perhaps the longest-serving employee but is the first to be made redundant. In any event, an employee who has served two years of continuous employment will be entitled to a redundancy payment based upon the years of service and the employee's age.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


redundancy
Termination of employment is due to redundancy where the dismissal is attributable wholly or mainly to the fact that:
• The employer has ceased or intends to cease to carry on business for the purposes of which the employee is employed either generally or at the employee's workplace; or
• The requirements of the business for employees to do work of a particular kind have ceased or diminished (or are expected to do so) either generally or at the employee's workplace (section 139(1), ERA 1996).
In the context of collective redundancies, redundancy is defined more widely as a dismissal which is not connected with the individual employee (section 188, TULRCA).
Related links

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.

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  • redundancy — [ri dun′dən sē] n. pl. redundancies [L redundantia] 1. the state or quality of being redundant; superfluity 2. a redundant quantity; overabundance 3. the use of redundant words 4. the part of a redundant statement that is superfluous 5. Brit.… …   English World dictionary

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