criminal injuries compensation


criminal injuries compensation
in the UK, a state-funded scheme by which payments are made to a person who is injured as a result of crime. It was originally ex gratia but is now statutory by virtue of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Act 1995. The scheme is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, which is a body corporate. There is a right of appeal on point of law. There is a list of qualifying offences including, among others, rape, assault and arson. Attempts are included. Generally included are offences that require proof of intent (or recklessness) to cause death or personal injury. Injuries sustained in apprehending or attempting to apprehend offenders are included. Applications are made by the injured party or his relative, if deceased. Compensation for pain and suffering is calculated according to a tariff. Future wage loss and other heads of damage are recoverable. If the injured person later recovers tort damages, he must repay the Board. The Board may refuse or reduce an award in light of the applicant's criminal record or his conduct in relation to the incident in question. Certain cases of domestic violence are excluded, as are incidents covered by compulsory insurance or by the Motor Insurers' Bureau. See also malicious injuries legislation.

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.

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